New App Introduces Kids to The Money Mammals Fundamentals: Financial Literacy Concepts that Every Child Should Learn

One of my daughter’s first savings goals was for a Razor scooter. I remember walking with her to make that purchase almost seven years ago now. She was initially distracted by the Dora the Explorer version of the scooter, which gave us a chance to talk about product quality (i.e.: Dora’s image and branding didn’t necessarily equate to a better scooter). She also learned a little lesson in longevity: She still rides her Razor, and there’s no way she’d now be caught riding that Dora scooter today. On the other hand, I still regularly sing “I’m the Map” when I have Google Maps open. What can I say? It’s catchy (and it’s a great way to embarrass your teenage daughter). I digress …

 

I am excited to announce that our new financial literacy app for kids is now available for download. The Money Mammals Save for a Goal App exposes early elementary- and preschool-aged children to the concept of delayed gratification. This is the second of our Money Mammals Fundamentals apps to address the three core financial literacy principles that kids should learn early: saving for goals, understanding the difference between needs and wants and learning to make smart money choices. An app for that last concept is in the works, so stay tuned.

 

In this newest mobile offering, Joe the Monkey walks kids through the process of setting a goal and then has them virtually work around the house to make money to save for that goal. The primary objective (You thought I might say “goal,” didn’t you?) of the app is to introduce kids to the importance of delayed gratification without using that very academic term. Joe also does some chores that don’t yield money to help kids understand that some jobs are necessary and important to do as a participating member of a household. You can read more about chores and allowance – and the ensuing debate – here.

 

Our Money Mammals Fundamentals apps entertain these up-and-coming money mavens by introducing them to core concepts from a very early age. Research suggests that kids can and should begin the money-smart learning process early, in part because they are inundated with media messages to spend from the time they begin toddling. The Money Mammals bring money-smart messages to kids — teaching them to share and save and spend smart — in fun, engaging ways, such as via these mobile app games. The pump becomes primed for parents to work with kids at any age to provide them invaluable real-world financial literacy experience.

 

John
Creator & Chief Mammal

 

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